12.13.2010

FLUXUS :: deborah wing-sproul


Deborah Wing-Sproul's Surface Tension 


with my painting, Anxieties + Alienations


December 9, 2010

12.02.2010

SURFACE :: TENSION

Please join us for a Closing Reception
Thursday 9 December 2010, 6 - 8 PM
for my show, Conditions of Existence
at Pelavin Gallery 13 Jay Street, TriBeCa
and the debut drawing performance of 
Surface Tension 
by celebrated performance artist Deborah Wing-Sproul
Surface Tension is Deborah Wing-Sproul's direct response to my painting, Anxieties and Alienations, currently on display. 

deborah wing-sproul
Surface Tension



a drawing performance by Deborah Wing-Sproul accompanying Kate Beck's solo exhibition, Conditions of Existence.
Deborah Wing-Sproul is a multidisciplinary artist working primarily in video and performance. Her performances (or "performative acts") permeate the genres of sculpture/installation, drawing, photography and printmaking. Beginning in the mid '70's she studied modern dance and later went on to choreograph. She has studied under Merce Cunningham and others, including Douglas Dunn, Dan Wagoner, Viola Farber Company members, and June Finch. Wing-Sproul has also studied with voice/movement composer/performer Meredith Monk and reperformed multiple works for Marina Abramović's retrospective, The Artist Is Present, MoMA, NYC, (March 14-May 31, 2010).
                                                                                                
Kate Beck    detail Anxieties + Alienations   
Poured Oil, Enamel, Powdered Graphite on Aluminum Panel 89 x 185 inches 2010

on Surface Tension:
"I’m interested in sustained, repeated and incremental movements. I’m also interested in stillness. These aspects of restrained movement engage me in terms of physical gesture, presence, focus and discipline but also in terms of what they can suggest (i.e., humility, vulnerability) or what they can lead to (i.e., subtle shifts in state of mind).

In responding to Kate Beck’s painting, Anxieties and Alienations, I wanted to make visible the kinetic sensibility within her gesture. Surface Tension parallels Beck’s commitment to the seemingly effortless act of a single line, or series of articulated lines.

In Transparent Gestures (2005) I explored the limits of my physical reach to create large-scale prints that captured distinct repetitious movements. Surface Tension is part of a larger series of performance drawings that I have been developing to engage my body in actions of minimal sustained movement. My devices represent conceptual constraints on the drawing process, limiting (while also supporting) my repertoire of movement and mark making.

Kate Beck    Anxieties + Alienations   
Poured Oil, Enamel, Powdered Graphite on Aluminum Panel 89 x 185 inches 2010                             
The gravitational pull in Beck’s Anxieties and Alienations is visceral. In turn, I push (against) gravity instead of falling from it. I am referring to all of her lines, painted and drawn, through the use of a single stroke of graphite. Surface Tension echos Anxieties and Alienations not because I use paint or move in a fluid way but because I empathize with her focus, intent, voice and vulnerability. Our works begin and end in different places but we recognize in each others process a shared internal language.

         “I’m not asking a poem to carry a lot of rocks in its pockets. Just being an ordinary observer and liver and feeler and letting the experience get through you onto the notebook with the pen, through the arm, out of the body, onto the page, without distortion.”                                   —Sharon Olds
                                                                                                                                              
My thanks and gratitude to Kate Beck for inviting me to perform this work in the context of her solo exhibition, Conditions of Existence; and to Todd Masters for the opportunity to premiere this piece at Pelavin Gallery, December 9, 2010."                                                               -Deborah Wing-Sproul
                                                                                                                                                     
Thank you,  Deborah